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26-Jul-2017 02:08

Thus, while there was a good measure of debate in the Early Church over the New Testament canon, the major writings are claimed to have been accepted by almost all Christians by the middle of the 3rd century.

Although these writings obviously possess for Clement considerable significance, he never refers to them as authoritative 'Scripture'.A brief summary of the acts was read at and accepted by the Councils of Carthage in 397 and 419. 405, Pope Innocent I sent a list of the sacred books to a Gallic bishop, Exsuperius of Toulouse.Christian scholars assert that, when these bishops and councils spoke on the matter, however, they were not defining something new but instead "were ratifying what had already become the mind of the Church." In the one-hundred-year period extending roughly from 50 to 150, a number of documents began to circulate among the churches, including epistles, gospels, memoirs, apocalypses, homilies, and collections of teachings.The Catholic Church made dogmatic definition upon its Biblical canon in 382 at the Council of Rome By the early 3rd century, Origen may have been using the same twenty-seven books as in the present New Testament canon, though there were still disputes over the acceptance of the Letter to the Hebrews, James, II Peter, II John, III John, Jude and Revelation, known as the Antilegomena.Likewise, the Muratorian fragment is evidence that, perhaps as early as 200, there existed a set of Christian writings somewhat similar to the twenty-seven-book NT canon, which included four gospels and argued against objections to them.

Although these writings obviously possess for Clement considerable significance, he never refers to them as authoritative 'Scripture'.

A brief summary of the acts was read at and accepted by the Councils of Carthage in 397 and 419. 405, Pope Innocent I sent a list of the sacred books to a Gallic bishop, Exsuperius of Toulouse.

Christian scholars assert that, when these bishops and councils spoke on the matter, however, they were not defining something new but instead "were ratifying what had already become the mind of the Church." In the one-hundred-year period extending roughly from 50 to 150, a number of documents began to circulate among the churches, including epistles, gospels, memoirs, apocalypses, homilies, and collections of teachings.

The Catholic Church made dogmatic definition upon its Biblical canon in 382 at the Council of Rome By the early 3rd century, Origen may have been using the same twenty-seven books as in the present New Testament canon, though there were still disputes over the acceptance of the Letter to the Hebrews, James, II Peter, II John, III John, Jude and Revelation, known as the Antilegomena.

Likewise, the Muratorian fragment is evidence that, perhaps as early as 200, there existed a set of Christian writings somewhat similar to the twenty-seven-book NT canon, which included four gospels and argued against objections to them.

The canon of the New Testament is the set of books Christians regard as divinely inspired and constituting the New Testament of the Christian Bible.