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03-Jun-2016 23:26

These include The National Trust and Colonial Williamsburg.Here in Massachusetts, the Cambridge Historical Commission has published a guide to historically appropriate colors.They used a reddish brown paint designed to look like the local brownstone and they actually added some brownstone dust into the paint. George Washington used this same technique on Mount Vernon.Of course the good thing about paint schemes is that- unlike getting rid of a house's original windows- they are not permanent.Again you notice how the version painted in white- while a beautiful house- fails to do justice to the great carpentry.The other common mistake is to make any late 19th century house look like a "Painted Lady".

The first is to paint a house that would have had many colors just one color, usually white.

Common exterior colors were reds, yellows, and greens.

I think that the colors from Old Village Paints represent 18th and 19th century paint colors fairly well.

The multi-color scheme expresses the architectural detail.

In point of fact, however, neither scheme is historically accurate.

The first is to paint a house that would have had many colors just one color, usually white.

Common exterior colors were reds, yellows, and greens.

I think that the colors from Old Village Paints represent 18th and 19th century paint colors fairly well.

The multi-color scheme expresses the architectural detail.

In point of fact, however, neither scheme is historically accurate.

Here's another case, this time with side by side Eastlake style houses in the town of Hudson, MA probably dating to the 1870s..