Louisville tv dating

12-Aug-2017 03:49

On January 1, 2012, WDRB was removed from most cable systems outside of the market as a result of a new corporate directive from Fox as part of its newest affiliation agreement that forbade WDRB from being distributed on providers outside of its home market to protect ratings for the network's affiliates in nearby markets; this rule has been a source of conflict in several other markets, which have had out-of-market Fox affiliates from adjacent areas pulled from local cable providers.

A few months later, the station removed the county outlines of Anderson and Franklin counties in Kentucky (the westernmost counties in the Lexington market) and Switzerland County in Indiana (within the Cincinnati market) from weather maps and severe weather alert displays; as a result, WDRB is the only Louisville area station that does not recognize Frankfort as being part of its viewing area.

Despite this, Frankfort and Lawrenceburg are still occasionally mentioned during on-air weather segments.

In the eastern half of the Bowling Green market, WDRB was carried on the Glasgow Electric Plant Board and South Central Rural Telephone Cooperative's cable system, despite the Glasgow area being in closer proximity to the viewing area of Nashville affiliate WZTV.

On April 5, 1987, when the network expanded its programming nationally to primetime, WDRB-TV became an affiliate of the Fox network (prior to WDRB joining the network, Fox had carried only a late night talk show, The Late Show, during its first year-and-a-half in existence).

WDRB-TV became one of two Fox affiliates serving the Louisville market in 1990, when Campbellsville-based WGRB (channel 34, later CW affiliate WBKI-TV) affiliated with the network, channel 34 served the southern portions of the market before it moved its transmitter farther north to service more of the market; WDRB, after dropping the "-TV" suffix, became the sole Fox station in Louisville when WGRB became a WB affiliate in 1997.

On June 1, 2012, WDRB, WMYO and their respective subchannels were pulled from the market's major cable provider Insight Communications, as Block was unable to come to terms on a new retransmission consent agreement with Time Warner Cable (which purchased Insight in February 2012 and officially took over and rebranded the company under the Time Warner Cable name in 2013).) of space at its Muhammad Ali Boulevard studio facility, including an expanded newsroom and sales area; the addition of two conference rooms; offices for finance and editing departments; and the addition of a secondary studio to be used for commercial and station projects.

In early 2011, the master control operations for WDRB and WMYO were upgraded to allow the transmission of syndicated and locally produced programs in high definition; it also upgraded its severe weather ticker seen on both stations to be overlaid on HD programming without having to downconvert the content to standard definition.WDRB-TV first signed on the air on February 28, 1971, becoming the first independent station in the Louisville market.The station's original studios were located on East Main Street in Louisville. each day; its programming included low-budget afternoon children's programming and occasional news updates provided by anchor Wilson Hatcher, and most notably, the shock-theater program Fright Night and afternoon children's host "Presto the Magic Clown." Fright Night showcased low-budget horror movies (similar to the Shroud film showcast on then-fellow independent WFFT-TV in Fort Wayne, Indiana); the program was hosted by local theater actor Charlie Kissinger and was unique in that it ran during Saturday prime time, directly competing against high-rated network programs.WDRB continued to carry cartoons through Fox Kids throughout the 1990s; the Fox Kids weekday afternoon lineup was discontinued at the end of 2001, when the remaining Saturday block moved to channel 58 until its successor 4Kids TV was discontinued by Fox in November 2008 due to a dispute with block lessee 4Kids Entertainment over compensation and affiliate clearance for the block.On April 21, 2007, WDRB became the first television station in Louisville to televise the Kentucky Derby Festival's all-day "Thunder Over Louisville" air and fireworks show in high definition—which at the time, was one of the largest technical undertakings ever attempted by an American television station.

In early 2011, the master control operations for WDRB and WMYO were upgraded to allow the transmission of syndicated and locally produced programs in high definition; it also upgraded its severe weather ticker seen on both stations to be overlaid on HD programming without having to downconvert the content to standard definition.WDRB-TV first signed on the air on February 28, 1971, becoming the first independent station in the Louisville market.The station's original studios were located on East Main Street in Louisville. each day; its programming included low-budget afternoon children's programming and occasional news updates provided by anchor Wilson Hatcher, and most notably, the shock-theater program Fright Night and afternoon children's host "Presto the Magic Clown." Fright Night showcased low-budget horror movies (similar to the Shroud film showcast on then-fellow independent WFFT-TV in Fort Wayne, Indiana); the program was hosted by local theater actor Charlie Kissinger and was unique in that it ran during Saturday prime time, directly competing against high-rated network programs.WDRB continued to carry cartoons through Fox Kids throughout the 1990s; the Fox Kids weekday afternoon lineup was discontinued at the end of 2001, when the remaining Saturday block moved to channel 58 until its successor 4Kids TV was discontinued by Fox in November 2008 due to a dispute with block lessee 4Kids Entertainment over compensation and affiliate clearance for the block.On April 21, 2007, WDRB became the first television station in Louisville to televise the Kentucky Derby Festival's all-day "Thunder Over Louisville" air and fireworks show in high definition—which at the time, was one of the largest technical undertakings ever attempted by an American television station.By 1977, the station expanded its broadcast day to a.m., with the addition of a four-hour block of religious programs. At that point, the station aired cartoons from to a.m., religious programs from a.m. In 1981, WDRB relocated its operations from its original studios in Louisville's Butchertown neighborhood to their current location on Muhammad Ali Boulevard.