Percent of marriage from online dating

15-Nov-2016 17:06

"We found evidence for a dramatic shift since the advent of the Internet in how people are meeting their spouse," said the study, led by John Cacioppo of the University of Chicago's Department of Psychology. marriages begin with online dating, and those couples may be slightly happier than couples who meet through other means, a U. The research is based on a nationally representative survey of 19,131 people who married between 20."These data suggest that the Internet may be altering the dynamics and outcomes of marriage itself," said Cacioppo."It is possible that individuals who met their spouse online may be different in personality, motivation to form a long-term marital relationship, or some other factor." But not all experts believe that online dating translates into instant bliss.Cacioppo acknowledged being a "paid scientific advisor" for the website, but said the researchers followed procedures provided by the Journal of the American Medical Association and agreed to oversight by independent statisticians.People who reported meeting their spouse online tended to be age 30-49 and of higher income brackets than those who met their spouses offline, the survey found.

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However, some experts took issue with the findings because the survey was commissioned by e Harmony.com, the dating site that attracted one quarter of all online marriages according to the research.About 45% of couples met on dating sites; the rest met on online social networks, chat rooms, instant messaging or other online forums.Lead author John Cacioppo, a psychologist and director of the Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience at the University of Chicago, says dating sites may "attract people who are serious about getting married."While Cacioppo is a noted researcher and the study is in a prestigious scientific journal, it is not without controversy.His research showed about 35 percent of relationships now start online."The overreach occurs when the authors conclude that meeting a partner online is better than meeting a partner through offline avenues," Finkel said.

However, some experts took issue with the findings because the survey was commissioned by e Harmony.com, the dating site that attracted one quarter of all online marriages according to the research.

About 45% of couples met on dating sites; the rest met on online social networks, chat rooms, instant messaging or other online forums.

Lead author John Cacioppo, a psychologist and director of the Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience at the University of Chicago, says dating sites may "attract people who are serious about getting married."While Cacioppo is a noted researcher and the study is in a prestigious scientific journal, it is not without controversy.

His research showed about 35 percent of relationships now start online.

"The overreach occurs when the authors conclude that meeting a partner online is better than meeting a partner through offline avenues," Finkel said.

It was commissioned by the dating website e Harmony, according to the study's conflict of interest statement.