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01-Oct-2017 05:40

Reverend Peterson encourages girls to be more assertive and to understand that their bodies are their own.

He talks to boys about the sports terms men use to reduce relationships to a game or a win-lose proposition.

To counter such trends, counselors, teachers, ministers, and coaches across the country are mounting dating-violence prevention campaigns.

On the premise that battered girlfriends can grow up to be battered wives and bullying boys can turn into battering men, they are using classrooms and theaters to help teens establish healthy relationships and leave abusive ones."Because teenagers don't know what the rules of dating relationships are yet and don't know what their own boundaries are, it's very easy for girls to get into relationships like that and very difficult to extricate themselves," says Rosalind Wiseman, executive director of the Empower Program in Bethesda, Md.

"We have more success with men who have shorter histories of abuse toward women.

And in a poll by Children Now, 15 percent of girls between 14 and 17 said a boyfriend had tried to force them to have sex.

He also involves parents in another retreat dealing with teen issues, including dating violence.

Companies too can play a part in heightening parents' awareness.

Students also "do a lot of minimizing" about abuse, Ms. "They'll say, 'He doesn't beat me, he just slaps me.' They think if they're not bruised and they don't fit the myth of what a battered person looks like - black eye, split lip - they're not being abused.

Rarely do they identify with emotional, verbal, and control issues." Control includes telling a girlfriend what she can and cannot wear, who her friends can be, and where she can go."Verbal abuse always starts first," Ms. "He starts to totally belittle you: 'You're so stupid. He thinks he can take out all his frustrations on you." As tension grows, a boy may become physically violent, as Mr.

And in a poll by Children Now, 15 percent of girls between 14 and 17 said a boyfriend had tried to force them to have sex.

He also involves parents in another retreat dealing with teen issues, including dating violence.

Companies too can play a part in heightening parents' awareness.

Students also "do a lot of minimizing" about abuse, Ms. "They'll say, 'He doesn't beat me, he just slaps me.' They think if they're not bruised and they don't fit the myth of what a battered person looks like - black eye, split lip - they're not being abused.

Rarely do they identify with emotional, verbal, and control issues." Control includes telling a girlfriend what she can and cannot wear, who her friends can be, and where she can go."Verbal abuse always starts first," Ms. "He starts to totally belittle you: 'You're so stupid. He thinks he can take out all his frustrations on you." As tension grows, a boy may become physically violent, as Mr.

It's your fault."For Reneca Logan and Jonathan Camillo, middle-school students in Boston, this troubling scene is only acting, part of a play called "Enough is Enough" to show teens the perils of abusive relationships.