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“They laugh and ask me questions that are irrelevant.” He, however, has a solution: “Let them laugh, but encourage them to ask what’s relevant to them.” Others like Dan Bahadur often find communicating sexual health in their local language very challenging: “Take ‘nightfall’ for example. Disabled youths who have spinal injury will have nightfall, but cannot feel it as they are paralyzed down the waist.

It’s important for them, as well as for those who care for them to know this, so they can maintain cleanliness.

Not long ago, they were socially ostracized, he says: “People looked down upon the disabled.

They were seen as people who brought bad luck to others.” Today, however, there are special facilities for people with disability, including quota in educational institutions and government jobs.

Our youth program “Rockets & Space” is featured in an International Media-In Depth News.

Kindly follow the link to read the original post “Nepal Youth Make Sexual Health Service More Accessible” published in 24th Nov, 2016.

Sitting in two semi-dark rooms of the 3 stories building are about a hundred adolescent boys and girls.

While her male colleagu Suraj meets the boys, Bhattarai and her female colleague Deepali Pradhan head for the girls room.

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So, for next 45 minutes, the young women explain to their audience the process of menstruation: they start a conversation by asking the students what changes when they have their first periods.

Vinuka Basnet, a 20-year old college student says that her parents were shocked when they came to know she was working as a sexual health worker.

‘They were embarrassed and afraid that now everyone would point at me and say “she talks of sex”.

Slowly, a girl stands up and says “sprouting of breasts”. “Their family members and their teachers feel embarrassed to talk about these things. Since May this year, he has been educating fellow youths with disability in his city on SRHR.

There are 3 million people with disability in Nepal today, says Bahadur, and nearly half of them young.

So, for next 45 minutes, the young women explain to their audience the process of menstruation: they start a conversation by asking the students what changes when they have their first periods.

Vinuka Basnet, a 20-year old college student says that her parents were shocked when they came to know she was working as a sexual health worker.

‘They were embarrassed and afraid that now everyone would point at me and say “she talks of sex”.

Slowly, a girl stands up and says “sprouting of breasts”. “Their family members and their teachers feel embarrassed to talk about these things. Since May this year, he has been educating fellow youths with disability in his city on SRHR.

There are 3 million people with disability in Nepal today, says Bahadur, and nearly half of them young.

The article was republished in another International blog “Sexual & Reproductive Health Matters”.