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13-Jul-2016 08:10

This is one of only two churches in Venice that are free standing, i.e. The 18th century art here holds little to surprise, and of course there's a Palma Giovane painting.

The organ over the entrance (built 1743-49 by Antonio and Tommaso Amigoni) has a balcony divided into five sections, each featuring somewhat feathery but strongly coloured paintings of The Life of Tobias by Giovanni Antonio Guardi (the elder brother of the more famous veduti-painter Francesco) in 1750-53.

The method by which he achieved the straightening involved digging away at the brickwork on the three sides away from the tilt and wedging wood into the holes.

The brick faade facing the square and the canal is early Venetian Renaissance and influenced by the work of Codussi.

The faade is by Sebastiano Mariano di Lugano, as are the statues, probably.

The statues are, from the top, the redeemer, the annunciation and the prophets The form of the interior dates from the original 14th Century Gothic building, but most of the decoration is later. There are twelve columns down each side, with gilded statues in each of the spandrels, much gilding of the arches, and a frieze of of paintings by late-17th and early-18th century painters you won't have heard of.

The church has no transept but has odd big singing galleries suspended either side of the apse entrance.

The method by which he achieved the straightening involved digging away at the brickwork on the three sides away from the tilt and wedging wood into the holes.

The brick faade facing the square and the canal is early Venetian Renaissance and influenced by the work of Codussi.

The faade is by Sebastiano Mariano di Lugano, as are the statues, probably.

The statues are, from the top, the redeemer, the annunciation and the prophets The form of the interior dates from the original 14th Century Gothic building, but most of the decoration is later. There are twelve columns down each side, with gilded statues in each of the spandrels, much gilding of the arches, and a frieze of of paintings by late-17th and early-18th century painters you won't have heard of.

The church has no transept but has odd big singing galleries suspended either side of the apse entrance.

Tradition has it that this church, dedicated to the Archangel Raphael, is one of the oldest in Venice, supposedly having been founded in 416, or 650.