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13-Apr-2017 03:34

That line was, of course, itself debated, as many writers disagreed on the point at which nature ended and sin began.

To further confuse the issue, the Middle Ages had writers who used allegorical and satirical styles of writing (much like some writers and publications in our own time) that could be easily misread, as well as "shock jocks" who thoroughly disagreed with commonly held notions of moral behavior and who did their best to cause controversy with their behavior and writings.

In general, the body's health was seen through an Aristotelian viewpoint.

Observing that human personalities could be divided into a few similar groupings, and that many illnesses were caused by and/or produced effects more like some personalities than others, classical and medieval authorities reasoned that the body was governed by substances called s, which ran throughout the body in differing quantities, not only causing variations in personality, but also causing varying states of health.

In order for a body to remain healthy, these humors had to remain in balance with each other, as too much of one and too little of another could cause disease or infirmity.

The logical step to cure disease, therefore, was to artificially balance out these humors through methods such as blood-letting, intestinal purging, and induced vomiting.

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Some classical texts on medicine had survived into the Middle Ages, and physicians and scholars used these as a starting point for medical knowledge.The following pages detail some of the more commonly used modes of discussing and depicting sex and sexual behavior from medical to moral to literary.Medieval Medicine Medieval medicine was both different from and similar to modern medicine.Some other treatises on women's health and women's bodies were not so free of morality.One such book, rather humorous by our standards, was a treatise called ), whose author claimed to be the German natural philosopher Albertus Magnus (a claim which scholars regard as spurious, resulting in the text's author being known as "Pseudo-Albertus Magnus"). [read more] Sex and Society The most difficult aspect of sex, widely acknowledged both by physicians and by priests, was its highly pleasurable nature, an aspect variously thought to indicate its inherently natural and/or sinful qualities.

Some classical texts on medicine had survived into the Middle Ages, and physicians and scholars used these as a starting point for medical knowledge.

The following pages detail some of the more commonly used modes of discussing and depicting sex and sexual behavior from medical to moral to literary.

Medieval Medicine Medieval medicine was both different from and similar to modern medicine.

Some other treatises on women's health and women's bodies were not so free of morality.

One such book, rather humorous by our standards, was a treatise called ), whose author claimed to be the German natural philosopher Albertus Magnus (a claim which scholars regard as spurious, resulting in the text's author being known as "Pseudo-Albertus Magnus"). [read more] Sex and Society The most difficult aspect of sex, widely acknowledged both by physicians and by priests, was its highly pleasurable nature, an aspect variously thought to indicate its inherently natural and/or sinful qualities.

Moral authorities such as the theologian Thomas Aquinas considered masturbation (also known as "onanism" from the Biblical story of Onan; see Genesis 38:7-10) to be "the sin of uncleanliness, which some call voluptuousness" and an "unnatural vice" because it is "contrary to the natural ordering of the sexual act that is proper to human beings" ( 154.5).